Slide 1

Slide 2
Slide 3

BSO research centre

The Research Centre at the British School of Osteopathy (BSO) supports the BSO's objectives and has several key aims:

  • To establish and maintain a recognisable reputation for high quality research at both a national and international level
  • To contribute to the body of osteopathic knowledge
  • To promote evidence-informed care
  • To support high quality education within the BSO
  • To contribute to the wider academic research and healthcare communities

Members of faculty have contributed to publications in peer-reviewed journals and successfully presented work at osteopathic research conferences as well as at general medical conferences nationally and internationally. An increasing number of faculty now review for journals and contribute to editorial boards. One member of the research team has been appointed as Editor for UK and Europe for the International Journal of Osteopathic Research. The Research and Treatment Bulletin, a previously in-house BSO publication, has been taken on by this journal as a regular section. This maturation of The Research and Treatment Bulletin is an important milestone and represents increased opportunities for faculty and others to seek publication. The BSO has also had a member of faculty appointed to a National Institute of Clinical Health and Excellence guideline development group for back pain.

Click here to download the BSO Research and Scholarship report for 2009/2010.

Core Research Staff

Steven Vogel DO

Steven Vogel is the Vice Principal (Research) at the British School of Osteopathy and editor of the International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine. In addition to his academic and clinical work, Steven has twice been a member of National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) Guideline Development Groups formulating clinical guidelines for back pain and sciatica. He led the large Clinical Risk Osteopathy and Management (CrOAM) study which examined adverse events and outcomes related to osteopathic interventions. His main research interests focus on back pain, clinicians’ beliefs and attitudes and more recently, reassurance, communicating and consent, safety and manual therapy.

Publications - Steven Vogel DO

Draper-Rodi, J., Vogel, S., & Bishop, A. (2016). Impact of an e-learning programme on the biopsychosocial model for non-specific low-back pain on experienced osteopaths’ attitudes to back pain: A mixed-methods study. Manual Therapy, 25(6), e167–e168.

Vaughan, B., Moran, R., Tehan, P., Fryer, G., Holmes, M., Vogel, S., & Taylor, A. (2016). Manual therapy and cervical artery dysfunction: Identification of potential risk factors in clinical encounters. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 21.

Vogel, S. (2016). Osteopathy - a complex business. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 19.

Holt, N., Pincus, T., & Vogel, S. (2015). Reassurance during low back pain consultations with GPS: A qualitative study. British Journal of General Practice, 65(639), e692–e701.

Vogel, S. (2015). Evidence, theory and variability in osteopathic practice. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 18(1).

Abbey, H., Esteves, J. E., Vogel, S., & Tyreman, S. J. (2014). Assessing criticality in student research reports: Preliminary results from a new educational card sorting activity. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 17(1), 12–21.

Vogel, S. (2014). Results, solutions, and learning: The continuing maturation of osteopathy. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 17(3).

Pincus, T., Holt, N., Vogel, S., Underwood, M., Savage, R., Walsh, D. A., & Taylor, S. J. C. (2013). Cognitive and affective reassurance and patient outcomes in primary care: A systematic review. Pain, 154(11). Konstantinou, K., Hider, S. L., Vogel, S., Beardmore, R., & Somerville, S. (2012). Development of an assessment schedule for patients with low back-associated leg pain in primary care: A Delphi consensus study. European Spine Journal, 21(7), 1241–1249.

Vogel, S., (2013). Adverse events and treatment reactions in osteopathy. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine 13; 3: 83-84.

Konstantinou, K., Beardmore, R., Dunn, K. M., Lewis, M., Hider, S. L., Sanders, T., … Hay, E. M. (2012). Clinical course, characteristics and prognostic indicators in patients presenting with back and leg pain in primary care. the ATLAS study protocol. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 13.

Pincus, T., R. Santos, and Vogel S., (2012). The Attitudes and Beliefs of Clinicians Treating Back Pain: Do They Affect Patients’ Outcome?, in From Acute to Chronic Back Pain, M. Hasenbring, M. Rusu, and D. Turk, Editors. 2012, Oxford University Press: Oxford. p. 405-415.

Parsons, S., Harding, G., Breen, A., Foster, N., Pincus, T., Vogel, S., & Underwood, M. (2012). Will shared decision making between patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain and physiotherapists, osteopaths and chiropractors improve patient care? Family Practice, 29(2).

Daniels, G., & Vogel, S. (2012). Consent in osteopathy: A cross sectional survey of patients’ information and process preferences. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 15(3).

Froud, R., Eldridge, S., Kovacs, F., Breen, A., Bolton, J., Dunn, K., … Underwood, M. (2011). Reporting outcomes of back pain trials: A modified Delphi study. European Journal of Pain, 15(10). Pincus, T., Woodcock, A., & Vogel, S. (2010). Returning back pain patients to work: How private musculoskeletal practitioners outside the National Health Service perceive their role (an interview study). Journal of Occupational Rehabilitation, 20(3), 322–330.

Vogel, S. (2009) NICE clinical guidelines. Low back pain: The early management of persistent non-specific back pain. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine 12; 4: 113-114.

Rusu, A. C., Vogel, S., Van der Merwe, J., Pither, C. and Pincus, T. (2009). Testing the schema enmeshment model of pain (semp): cognitive biases, depressed mood and future thinking in chronic pain. European Journal of Pain 13; Supplement 1: S139-S139.

Zamani, J., Vogel, S., Moore, A. and Lucas, K. (2008) Exploring the use of exercise therapy in UK osteopathic practice. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine 11; 4: 164-164.

Gosling, C., Moran, R., & Vogel, S. (2008). Attitudes towards research in Australian and New Zealand osteopaths. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 11(4), 154–155.

Gosling, C., Moran, R. and Vogel, S. (2008) Attitudes towards research in Australian and New Zealand osteopaths. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine 11; 4: 154-155.

 Vogel, S., & Herrick, R. (2008). Service delivery characteristics of UK osteopaths – a cross sectional survey. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 11(4), 153.

 Zamani, J., Vogel, S., Moore, a., & Lucas, K. (2008). Exploring the use of exercise therapy in UK osteopathic practice. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 11(4), 164.

 Parsons, S., Harding, G., Breen, a, Foster, N., Pincus, T., Vogel, S., & Underwood, M. (2007). The influence of patients’ and primary care practitioners’ beliefs and expectations about chronic musculoskeletal pain on the process of care: a systematic review of qualitative studies. Clin J Pain, 23(1), 91–98.

Parsons, S., Breen, A., Foster, N. E., Letley, L., Pincus, T., Vogel, S., & Underwood, M. (2007). Prevalence and comparative troublesomeness by age of musculoskeletal pain in different body locations. Family Practice, 24(4), 308–316.

Zamani, J., Vogel, S., Moore, A., & Lucas, K. (2007). Analysis of exercise content in undergraduate osteopathic education - A content analysis of UK curricula. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 10(4), 97–103.

Carnes, D., Parsons, S., Ashby, D., Breen, A., Foster, N. E., Pincus, T., Vogel S., Underwood, M. (2007). Chronic musculoskeletal pain rarely presents in a single body site: Results from a UK population study. Rheumatology, 46(7), 1168–1170.

Pincus, T., Foster, N. E., Vogel, S., Santos, R., Breen, A., & Underwood, M. (2007). Attitudes to back pain amongst musculoskeletal practitioners: A comparison of professional groups and practice settings using the ABS-mp. Manual Therapy, 12(2), 167–175.

 Pincus, T., Vogel, S., Santos, R., Breen, A., Foster, N., Underwood, M., … Underwood, M. (2006). The attitudes to back pain scale in musculoskeletal practitioners (ABS-mp): the development and testing of a new questionnaire. The Clinical Journal of Pain, 22(4), 378–86.

 Pincus, T., Vogel, S., Breen, A., Foster, N., & Underwood, M. (2006). Persistent back pain - Why do physical therapy clinicians continue treatment? A mixed methods study of chiropractors, osteopaths and physiotherapists. European Journal of Pain, 10(1), 67–76.

Pincus, T., Vogel, S., Burton, A. K., Santos, R., & Field, A. P. (2006). Fear avoidance and prognosis in back pain: A systematic review and synthesis of current evidence. Arthritis and Rheumatism, 54(12), 3999–4010.

 Parsons, S., Carnes, D., Pincus, T., Foster, N., Breen, A., Vogel, S., & Underwood, M. (2006). Measuring troublesomeness of chronic pain by location. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 7(1), 34.

Vogel, S., Dear, J., & Evans, D. (2005). The UK BEAM trial - A review and discussion. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 8(2), 62–68.

 Grundy, M., & Vogel, S. (2005). Attitudes towards prescribing rights: A qualitative focus group study with UK osteopaths. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 8(1), 12–21.

 Evans, D. W., Foster, N. E., Underwood, M., Vogel, S., Breen, A. C., & Pincus, T. (2005). Testing the effectiveness of an innovative information package on practitioner reported behaviour and beliefs: the UK Chiropractors, Osteopaths and Musculoskeletal Physiotherapists Low back pain ManagemENT (COMPLeMENT) trial [ISRCTN77245761]. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 6, 41.

 Pincus, T., Williams, A. C. D. C., Vogel, S., & Field, A. (2004). The development and testing of the depression, anxiety, and positive outlook scale (DAPOS). Pain, 109(1–2), 181–188.

Nash, K. and Vogel, S. (2002) Developing research at The British School of Osteopathy. Journal of Osteopathic Medicine 5; 2: 87-88.

Foster, N. E., Pincus, T., Underwood, M., Vogel, S., Breen, A., & Harding, G. (2003). Treatment and the process of care in musculoskeletal conditions: A multidisciplinary perspective and integration. Orthopedic Clinics of North America, 34(2), 239–244.

Pincus, T., Burton, A. K., Vogel, S., & Field, A. P. (2002). A systematic review of psychological factors as predictors of chronicity/disability in prospective cohorts of low back pain. Spine (Phila Pa 1976), 27(5), E109-20.

 Langworthy, J. M., Breen, A. C., Vogel, S., & Collier, R. (2002). Chiropractic and the national health care system: A basis for partnership in the UK. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 25(1), 21–33.

Pincus, T., Vogel, S., Savage, R., & Newman, S. (2000). Patients’ satisfaction with osteopathic and GP management of low back pain in the same surgery. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 8(3), 180–186.

Hilary Abbey MSc, PGDip, PGCert, DO

Hilary Abbey qualified as an Osteopath in 1979 and currently works full time at the British School of Osteopathy, where she is the Head of Research and a Senior Clinic Tutor. She is also the Project Leader for ‘OsteoMAP’, the Osteopathy, Mindfulness and Acceptance- based Programme for patients with persistent pain, which was funded as an innovative clinical service development project by the UK Department of Health from June 2013 to May 2016. Hilary continues to lead the OsteoMAP clinics that are now being run as part of the BSO’s specialist community clinic provision and is helping to develop new service at the European School of Osteopathy. She has a long-standing interest in psychological and social aspects of healthcare, developed through experiences of working in Africa and Asia, and she qualified as a counsellor in 2005. Hilary is in the process of completing a Professional Doctorate involving the integration of psychological acceptance-based and mindfulness interventions into standard osteopathic assessment and treatment practices.

Publications - Hilary Abbey MSc, PGDip, PGCert, DO

Abbey, H. (2015). Multidisciplinary biopsychosocial rehabilitation for chronic low back pain: Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 18(3), 239-240

Abbey, H., Esteves, J. E., Vogel, S., & Tyreman, S. J. (2014). Assessing criticality in student research reports: Preliminary results from a new educational card sorting activity. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 17(1), 12–21.

Brunt, H., & Abbey, H. (2014). An audit of the accuracy of medication documentation in a United Kingdom osteopathic training clinic before and after an educational intervention. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 17(2), 102–109.

Abbey, H., & Nanke, L. (2014). Developing OsteoMAP: A new programme to expand the scope of care for patients with persistent pain. Bone & Joint Journal, 96-B:(SUPP 4) 44

Abbey, H., & Nanke, L. (2013). Developing a chronic pain self-management clinic at the British School of Osteopathy: Quantitative pilot study results. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 16(1), e11–e12.

Esteves, J. E., Wheatley, L., Mayall, C., & Abbey, H. (2013). Emotional processing and its relationship to chronic low back pain: Results from a case-control study. Manual Therapy, 18(6), 541–546.

Mars, T. S., & Abbey, H. (2010). Mindfulness meditation practise as a healthcare intervention: A systematic review. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 13(2), 56–66.

 Abbey, H. (2008). Assessing clinical competence in osteopathic education: Analysis of outcomes of different assessment strategies at the British School of Osteopathy. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 11(4), 125–131.

Oliver Thomson PhD, MSc, BSc (Hons) Ost Med, BSc (Hons), DO

Dr Oliver Thomson is a practicing osteopath and Senior Lecturer at the British School of Osteopathy where he leads the research teaching for the undergraduate and postgraduate osteopathy programs. Oliver completed his PhD in osteopathy at the University of Brighton, Clinical Research Centre for Health Professions, where he explored clinical decision-making. His research interests include clinical decision reasoning, professional identity and beliefs, and qualitative research. He is an Associate Editor of the International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine and is on the advisory board for Manual Therapy Journal.

Publications - Oliver Thomson PhD, MSc, BSc (Hons) Ost Med, BSc (Hons), DO

Zangoni, G., & Thomson, O. P. (2016). “I need to do another course”- Italian physiotherapists’ knowledge and beliefs when assessing psychosocial factors in patients presenting with chronic low back pain. Musculoskeletal Science and Practice, 27, 71–77.

Thomson, O. P., & Collyer, K. (2016). “Talking a different language” – A qualitative study on low back pain patients’ interpretation of the language used by student osteopaths. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine.

Hirai, P. M., & Thomson, O. P. (2016). T4 syndrome- A distinct theoretical concept or elusive clinical entity? A case report. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, 20(4), 722–727.

Hohenschurz-Schmidt, D. J., Esteves, J. E., & Thomson, O. P. (2016). Tensegrity and manual therapy practice: A qualitative study. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 21, 5–18.

Pollard-Smith, T., & Thomson, O. P. (2016). Professional ballet dancers’ experience of injury and osteopathic treatment in the UK: A qualitative study. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies.

Thomson, O. P., & Evans, D. W. (2016). Masterclasses - integrating research evidence with expertise into clinical practice. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 20, 1–2.

Stenberg, G., Fjellman-Wiklund, A., & Ahlgren, C. (2014). “I am afraid to make the damage worse” - fear of engaging in physical activity among patients with neck or back pain - a gender perspective. Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 28(1), 146–154.

 Thomson, O. P., Petty, N. J., & Moore, A. P. (2014). Clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches in osteopathy - A qualitative grounded theory study. Manual Therapy, 19(1), 44–51.

Thomson, O. P., Petty, N. J., & Moore, A. P. (2014). Diagnostic reasoning in osteopathy - A qualitative study. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 17(2), 83–93.

Thomson, O. P., Petty, N. J., & Moore, A. P. (2014). A qualitative grounded theory study of the conceptions of clinical practice in osteopathy - A continuum from technical rationality toprofessional artistry. Manual Therapy, 19(1), 37–43.

 Thomson, O. P., Petty, N. J., & Moore, A. P. (2014). Osteopaths’ professional views, identities and conceptions - A qualitative grounded theory study. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 17(3), 146–159.

 Thomson, O. P., Petty, N. J., & Scholes, J. (2014). Grounding osteopathic research - Introducing grounded theory. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 17(3), 167–186.

Thomson, Oliver P. et al. (2013). Clinical reasoning and therapeutic approaches of experienced osteopaths. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 16(1), 15 -16.

Esteves, J. E., Bennison, M., & Thomson, O. P. (2013). Script concordance test: Insights from the literature and early stages of its implementation in osteopathy. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 16(4), 231–239.

Lougee, H., Johnston, R. G., & Thomson, O. P. (2013). The suitability of sham treatments for use as placebo controls in trials of spinal manipulative therapy: A pilot study. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, 17(1), 59–68.

Fisher, G., Ramadan, H., & Thomson, O. (2013). Can a high-velocity low-amplitude thrust manipulation of C1-2 affect active depression of the temporomandibular joint in a symptomatic population? International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 16(1), e21–e22.

Thomson, O. P., Petty, N. J., & Moore, A. P. (2013). Reconsidering the patient-centeredness of osteopathy. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 16(1), 25–32.

McSweeney, T. P., Thomson, O. P., & Johnston, R. (2012). The immediate effects of sigmoid colon manipulation on pressure pain thresholds in the lumbar spine. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, 16(4), 416–423.

Petty, N. J., Thomson, O. P., & Stew, G. (2012). Ready for a paradigm shift? Part 1: Introducing the philosophy of qualitative research. Manual Therapy, 17(4), 267–274.

Petty, N. J., Thomson, O. P., & Stew, G. (2012). Ready for a paradigm shift? Part 2: Introducing qualitative research methodologies and methods. Manual Therapy, 17(5), 378–384.

Thomson, O. P., Petty, N. J., Ramage, C. M., & Moore, A. P. (2011). Qualitative research: Exploring the multiple perspectives of osteopathy. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 14(3), 116–124.

Thomson, O. P., Petty, N. J., & Moore, A. P. (2011). Clinical reasoning in osteopathy - More than just principles? International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 14(2), 71–76.

Thomson, O., Haig, L., & Mansfield, H. (2009). The suitability of high-velocity low-amplitude thrust manipulation and mobilisation techniques on pressure pain threshold in the lumbar spine. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 12(2), 56–62.

Michael Ford PhD, MA, MSc, PgDip

Michael began his career working in research into language processing, moving into lecturing on a variety of topics including research methods and biological psychology. He also delivered general psychology seminars on a regular basis at the University of East Anglia in Norwich. In 2011 he took up a role as Research and CAE Officer at the BSO, assisting the Vice Principal (Research) and Head of Student Research in the delivery of a variety of student research platforms, as well as Unit Leader for the CAE unit at levels 4 and 5. Michael has published in a range of publications related to language processing, including semantic context, derivational morphology, repetition priming of spoken words, electrophysiological manifestations of psycholinguistic processes, visual word recognition, verb inflection, and computation of word meanings.

Kevin Brownhill PhD, MSc, BSc (Ost)

Kevin Brownhill is a researcher, as well as an osteopath in practice. His research interests include relationships between symptoms and function in the musculoskeletal system. Kevin’s PhD explored relationships between intervertebral coordination and back pain. He is currently pursuing functional back pain collaborations with several external academic institutes, and is sponsored by a Society of Back Pain Research travel fellowship. Kevin recently completed a Master’s degree in Statistics and is able to offer staff and students support in this area, as well as with the technicalities of physical measurement.

Amanda Philips MA BOst BSc (Hons) PGCE

Before becoming an osteopath, Amanda worked as a teacher for fifteen years and gained experience of working with children of all ages and abilities. Her first degree was in Geography and she subsequently gained her MA in Education from the Open University. Amanda joined the osteopathic register in 2005 and returned to the College of Osteopaths, where she had completed her training.  Initially a Research Tutor, she now acts as Admissions Tutor for the college as well as Module Leader for first year Anatomy, Physiology, and Research. In 2015, Amanda was amongst the first cohort selected for the Osteopathic Leadership Programme, in collaboration with the OU.  Recently she has joined the faculty at the British School of Osteopathy research team as unit leader for the 'Developing Criticality in Osteopathy' units on the part-time programme.

Jerry Draper-Rodi D.Prof.(Ost), PG Dip, PG Cert, DO

Dr Jerry Draper-Rodi is an academic clinician: he is CPD Manager and Research Lecturer at the British School of Osteopathy, and chairs Oxfordshire Osteopathic Network and practices in Oxfordshire. He was awarded a Professional Doctorate in Osteopathy in 2016. His research was on the acceptability, feasibility and likely impact of a biopsychosocially-informed e-learning programme for non-specific LBP on experienced osteopathic practitioners' attitudes to back pain. He has presented his research at numerous conferences, including IFOMPT, SBPR, iO, CAMstrand and ICOM; and published articles in peer-reviewed journals and a book chapter. Jerry is a reviewer for the International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine.  In 2016, Jerry received two prestigious awards, including The Research in Practice Award from the Institute of Osteopathy and The Secretaries Award from The Society for Back Pain Research.

Publications - Jerry Draper-Rodi D.Prof.(Ost), PG Dip, PG Cert, DO

Draper-Rodi, J., Vogel, S., & Bishop, A. (2016). Impact of an e-learning programme on the biopsychosocial model for non-specific low-back pain on experienced osteopaths’ attitudes to back pain: A mixed-methods study. Manual Therapy, 25(6), e167–e168.

Gabutti, M., & Draper-Rodi, J. (2014). Osteopathic decapitation: Why do we consider the head differently from the rest of the body? New perspectives for an evidence-informed osteopathic approach to the head. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 17(4), 256–262.

 Draper-Rodi, J. (2013). Alterations in the multifidus structure and activity in individuals with unilateral recurrent low back pain, despite being pain free and functionally recovered. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 16(2), 122–123.

Draper-Rodi, J. (2013). Should we start carrying out HVT on disc herniations? International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 16(4), 244–245.

Gabutti, M., Draper-Rodi, J. (2013). Re: An investigation of cranial motion through a review of biomechanically based skull deformation literature. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 16(3), 178- 179.

Lorraine Nanke PhD, MSc Clin Psych, BSc (Hons)

Dr Lorraine Nanke is the OsteoMAP Programme Developer. Lorraine completed her PhD in osteopathy at the University of Surrey, where she explored meaning and mechanism in osteopathy. She works as a Principal Clinical and Health Psychologist for Surrey and Borders Partnership NHS Trust in the UK and has considerable experience of using ACT and Mindfulness in clinical work and teaching in the NHS. She has been involved in osteopathic education and research at the British School of Osteopathy for over 20 years, focusing on psychosocial aspects of osteopathic practice, patient management skills, embodiment, chronic pain management, qualitative research methods and human development.

Stephen Tyreman PhD, MA, DO

Stephen Tyreman qualified from the British School of Osteopathy (London) in 1974, and started teaching at the BSO in 1978. His current role is Dean of Osteopathic Education Development and Course Leader for the Professional Doctorate in Osteopathy. He was appointed Professor of Osteopathy and Philosophy by the University of Bedfordshire in 2006 and made professor at the Norwegian University College of Health Sciences, Oslo in 2011. He continues to practice 2 days a week in Lincoln, Lincolnshire.

Stephen received a MA in Philosophy of Medicine and Healthcare from the University of Wales in 1989. His PhD was awarded by the Open University in 2001 with a thesis on 'The Concept of Function in Osteopathy and Orthodox Medicine'.

His current projects include: developing a health-focused and values-based curriculum for osteopathic undergraduates; exploring uncertainty as the proper epistemological basis for healthcare practice; and developing an ecological narrative of healthcare. He has been working with Prof K. W. M Fulford at the Collaborating Centre for Values-Based Practice at Oxford University and the General Osteopathic Council, to develop a values-based practice basis for osteopathic regulation in the UK. He is also involved in a funded collaboration between universities in the UK and Norway examining the concept of causation in healthcare.

Publications - Stephen Tyreman PhD, MA, DO

Tyreman, S., (2015), Trust and truth: uncertainty in health care practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 21, 470–478.

Tyreman, S., & Cymet, T. (2014). Creating an osteopathic community with education at its core. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 17(1), 1–4.

Abbey, H., Esteves, J. E., Vogel, S., & Tyreman, S. J. (2014). Assessing criticality in student research reports: Preliminary results from a new educational card sorting activity. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 17(1), 12–21.

Tyreman, S. (2013). Re-evaluating “osteopathic principles.” International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 16(1), 38–45.

Tyreman, S., & Cymet, T. (2012). Osteopathic education: Editorial call for papers. International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 15(3), 86–91.

Tyreman, S. (2011). Integrity: Is it still relevant to modern healthcare? Nursing Philosophy, 12(2), 107–118.

Tyreman, S. (2011). Homelikeness and health: An introduction to the theme. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy, 14(3), 287–289.

Tyreman, S. (2011). The happy genius of my household: Phenomenological and poetic journeys into health and illness. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy, 14(3), 301–311.

Tyreman, S. (2008). Valuing osteopathy: What are (our) professional values and how do we teach them? International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 11(3), 90–95.

Tyreman, S. (2008). Commentary on “Is there a place for science in the definition of osteopathy”? International Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, 11(3), 102–105.

Tyreman, S. (2000). Promoting critical thinking in health care: phronesis and criticality. Medicine, Health Care, and Philosophy, 3(2), 117–124.

Pringle, M., & Tyreman, S. (1993). Study of 500 patients attending an osteopathic practice. British Journal of General Practice, 43(366), 15–18.

Honorary and external research appointments

Professor Tamar Pincus

Professor in Health Psychology, Department of Psychology, Royal Holloway, University of London
Honorary title: Associate Professor
Qualifications: PhD, MPhil, MSc, BSc (Hons)

Dr David Evans

Osteopath, Birmingham Back Care Clinic
Honorary title: Honorary Research Fellow
Qualifications: PhD, BSc (Hons) Ost

Dr David Langley

Director of Research and Enterprise Development, University of Bristol
Honorary title: External member of the Research and Scholarship Strategy Committee
Qualifications: PhD, BSc